[Image description: a light-skinned person with dark brown glasses is facing into the camera. Her eyes are partly closed from smiling. She wears a light green dress. Behind her are open areas of grass and trees.]

[Image description: a light-skinned person with dark brown glasses is facing into the camera. Her eyes are partly closed from smiling. She wears a light green dress. Behind her are open areas of grass and trees.]

Research Interests: critical disability studies | feminist STS | digital humanities | labor studies | crip technoscience | D/deaf studies | ethics of care | access studies | history of technology | future of work

email: louhicky(@)gmail.com

Louise Hickman is an activist and scholar of communication, and uses ethnographic, archival, and theoretical approaches to consider how access is produced for disabled people. Her current project focuses particularly on access produced by real-time stenographers and transcriptive technologies in educational settings. She uses an interdisciplinary lens drawing on feminist theory, critical disability studies, and science and technology studies to consider the historical conditions of access work, and the ways access is co-produced through human (and primarily female) labor, technological systems, and economic models and conditions. Hickman has previously served as an access consultant for β€˜Catalyst: Feminism, Theory and Technoscience,’ a peer-reviewed, open-source journal advocating for a platform where access remains a reflexive, collaborative, and distributed effort in digital and disability design. She is currently a member of the Critical Design Lab. She holds a PhD in Communication from the University of California, San Diego, and is currently working on her first manuscript: β€œThe Automation of Access.”

Since 2016, Louise has also worked as an access consultant and speaker for Parkeology, a U.S. based public art program.